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MUSEUM OF YESTERDAY

 
Radio Related Links
ARRL Website
 
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Atwater Kent Website
 

from OTR.net


The Crosley Radio Gallery

You are in Gallery 5 of the Communications Collection...

Please continue on your tour.

 
 
THE COMPONENTS THAT MADE RADIO
 
VACUUM TUBES
At left, the museum's DeForest Audion Tube. This is a rare and treasured piece of the collection.
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Dr. Lee DeForest, pictured above, is credited with the invention of the vacuum tube, a device which revolutionized radio in the early 20th Century. While it is universally accepted that he was the inventor, testimony from later patent infringement lawsuits between DeForest and fellow inventor Edwin Armstrong, proved that DeForest did not fully understand the operation of his own invention. It was Armstrong who deployed DeForest's laboratory experimental device to bring us modern radio circuitry including the Super-regenerative and Super-hetrodyne receiver as we know it.
 
The following photos are from the museum's extensive 1906-1970 vacuum tube collection.
A large transmitting tube from a commercial AM station
 

Some of the vacuum tube brands available in the "radio" years. Note that, as television, high fidelity and industrial use of tubes developed, branding also changed. Older packaging generally referred to the contents as "radio" tubes whereas newer versions adopted the term "electron or electronic" tube. Some brands even adopted their own terms such as "radiotron," "hy-tron" and "reliatron."

While there were literally hundreds of tube brands packaged and sold throughout the history of radio, here is a listing of some of the more popular brands:

ALLIED
ARCTURUS
ADMIRAL
CBS HYTRON
CROSLEY
CUNNINGHAM
DEFOREST
DELCO
DUMONT
EIMAC
GENERAL ELECTRIC
GREELEY
JAN (Joint Army-Navy)
(JAN labeling was applied generic and combined brands of tubes supplied under military contracts)
KEN-RAD
LAFAYETTE
MARCONI
MULLARD
NATIONAL UNION
PHILCO
RAYTHEON
RCA
SILVERTONE
STANDARD BRAND
SYLVANIA
TAYLOR
TUNG-SOL
WESTERN ELECTRIC
WESTINGHOUSE
ZENITH

 
Although there were many brands of tubes that came and later faded from the scene, such as Cunningham, National Union and Tung-Sol, one unique brand made it mark both with early reliability and its distinctive blue glass envelopes. Pictured above are examples of "Arcturus Blue" tubes from the 1920s.
 
View of our vacuum tube collection which spans 1906 through 1960.
 
High Voltage Mercury Arc Rectifier tube
 
Receiver vacuum tubes from the 1920s "battery radio era"
A transmitter modulator tube from a large Western Electric commercial broadcast transmitter
 
 
More high-power transmitter tubes, most dating to the World War II era.
 
A general sampling of vacuum tubes used in receivers and small transmitters from the 1930s through the 1960s
 
At the center of photo above is a high power final amplifier tube from a large broadcast transmitter.
 
 
 
HAND-WIRED CHASSIS HARDWARE
The following photographs illustrate some of the chassis hardware that was available to builders of hand-wired radio receiving, transmitting and test equipment in the era prior to introduction of printed circuit technology.
 
Tube sockets, connectors and switches used in the era of "hand wired" radio chassis.
 
An assortment of meters and other components intended for use with hand-wired chassis.
 
An assortment of variable capacitors used in receivers and transmitters of the era
 
Some examples of potentiometers used in early radio construction.
 
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Here is some valuable technical information. The chart below illustrates how technicians read the values of components, such as resistors, based on color bands that are stamped on the parts. Often, this is the only way to identify the value of a part in a radio that is undergoing repair or restoration.

NOTE: You can click the picture below to see an enlarged version.

 
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An assortment of radio transformers from the 1920's through the 1930's
 
A collection of radio equipment knobs used between 1920 and 1960
 
Please continue on to the next gallery
Copyright 2014 The Museum Of Yesterday, Chesterfield, VA USA